About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 409
LANGUAGE
English 409
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 409 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> what you are listening to are actual calls. >> how is he acting? >> at the washington poison center in seattle. >> just drowse? i okay. >> and lately, more and more of them sound something like this. >> and today, i took about 90 milligrams of percoset. >> oh you did? >> 6:00, i wasn't really thinking and i did a bar of xanax and i'm reading all this stuff online how that is a very lethal combination. i have a lot of friends who died in their sleep and i just wasn't really thinking. now i'm wondering if i should stay up tonight. >> that kind of call to me is really scary. >> oh, it is scary. >> what goes through your mind? >> so, i would be very frightened about that young man not making through the night. >> dr. bill hurley is the medical director of the poison center. he is also a trauma doctor. >> possibly too many of his meds. they are not sure what-all they've got. >> we are here in seattle, in part, because the problem is bad. >> this bottle still has quite a bit in it. >> but also because, as you will see, there are real solutions. >> no other meds? >> for hurley you it start
. this is "your money." the elections are over. the american people have spoken. now it's time for washington to get to work. >> you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. >> that's because nothing is more important to our economic recovery than creating jobs. president obama says he'll add 12 million jobs over the next four years. but for his math to work, the pace of economic growth needs to pick up. with a crisis in europe and a slowdown in asia, an economic storm beyond our control stands ready to batter our shores. still, two years of consistent job growth prove we are heading in the right direction, but the fiscal cliff is one storm that will be of our own making unless washington acts. $7 trillion in across-the-board tax hikes and spending cuts over the next decade mandated to begin in january. it's the legislative equivalent of a slow motion train wreck that washington can avoid. the question? will congress and the president drive that train over a cliff? >> we won't solve the problem of our fiscal imbalance overnight. >> the elections are over. the threats to our economy are not
years she worked for him. rogers has not responded to the claims. >>> voters in two states, washington state and colorado, voted to legalize marijuana for recreational use. we're not talking about medicine, but simply to get high for fun. check out some of the reaction in colorado this week. >> i am feeling amazing. this is the best day i've seen in my life. >> obviously, it's always nice to be right. so, but, you know, we're really happy and, most importantly, it's just great that we're not going to see another 10,000 colorado e coloradoans arrested. >> joining me now is neal franklin, a 32-year law enforcement veteran in maryland and also speaks for a group called le against prohibition. >> i'm in favor because marijuana legalization is not something new. this policy of prohibition has been a perpetual policy disaster for over four decades now. as a matter of fact, one of the first law enforcement leaders, a man by the name of august vietnam vommer chief of berkeley in california and also the first leader of international chiefs of police. right after the end of alcohol prohibition i
nine days after the story broke. >> joining us now, tara mckelvey. and here in washington, rajiv chandrasekaran, senior correspondent and editor for "the washington post." rajiv, you've covered the war in afghanistan extensively. did you get invited on trips with david petraeus, how well did you know him and how well -- >> i covered him off and on first back in iraq when he was a division commander up in northern iraq and more recently when he was top commander of all u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan and in that later job i did travel around the country with him. he would give remarkable access to journalists. oftentimes it was under very strict ground rules that things were off the record but he did open himself up to press coverage because he thought it was important for the mission to get recognized out there, but also i believe because he also liked to see himself at the center of the coverage. >> so that remarkable access paid dividends for petraeus's image. would you say, would you argue with the notion that many of the jurmts who dealt with him, who know him, have tende
on the dysfunction in washington that americans said they hate. they went to bed election night hoping to fix that. speed really matters here. in just seven weeks the bush tax cuts expire, automatic spending cuts agreed to by both parties kick in. we call it the fiscal cliff and even though it's more like the fiscal steep slope it could do some very bad things to the economy. concerns about rolling down it or falling off it or whatever you want to call it have made markets nervous and credit rating agencies and economists of all stripes are warning about the consequences of not hammering out a deal in time. politicians in both parties, they've been sending out mixed signals ever since the election. on the one hand they're talking about common ground. take a look. >> we want our children to live in america that isn't burdened by debt. that isn't threatened by a warming planet. >> the nation as you know is at a critical point. at a time like this, we can't risk partisan bickering and political posturing. >> if there's a mandate in yesterday's results it's a mandate for us to find a way to work toget
ago and they almost brought us to the brink of disaster on that. i'm worried that washington even under remarkable pressure doesn't always do the right thing. i'm not satisfied now that the fiscal cliff is getting the love that it deserves. everybody is talking about it, it's the first order of business. nobody in washington is talking about anything else right now. so i think everybody gets this is very serious. i just want to remind people the u.s. is growing at 2% right now. that is not very strong. the fiscal cliff, if we went over it, could take 3.5% off of that taking us down to 1.5% negative growth and that is a recession. >> there's something interesting happening among, i would say, progressives. there's a lot of talk about compromise from the major players but let's talk about what progressives are saying. there was an op-ed in "the new york times" saying the president shouldn't do anything about the fiscal cliff. he writes this is definitely no time to negotiate a grand bargain on the budget that snatches defeat from the jaws of victory. jessica yellin, this is the coun
dynamic as the old congress, but there's a new optimism in washington about solving our problems. >> we want an agreement. we want an agreement. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. >> i think it's important for us to come to an agreement with the president. >> and that starts with the fiscal cliff. we've sounded the warning. >> job destruction that would happen under the fiscal cliff. >> economic growth is at 2%. this only hurts it. >> on the edge of a fiscal cliff. >> could do some very bad things to the economy. >> but how should you prepare for this scary scenario or for any deals washington makes to avoid it? it's about getting back to basics. taxes, investments, savings, retirement, jobs, the things that made americans secure in the past are no longer guarante guarantees. now a prosperous future depends on knowledge and a solid plan. remember, smart is the new rich. while there's uncertainty in the broader economy, your personal economy can still thrive. washington, wall street, main street, all trying to figure out what the tax bill is going to look like. most republ
making unless washington acts. $7 trillion in across the board tax hikes and spending cuts over the next decade mandated to begin in january. it's the legislative equivalent of a slow motion train wreck that washington can avoid. the question, will congress and the president drive that train over a cliff? >> we won't solve the problem of our fiscal imbalance overnight. >> the elections are over. the threats to our economy are not. time to get to work. and there is lots of work to be done. starts with averting the disaster of our own making. i repeat that. the fiscal cliff. we've got it covered frommive angle. christine romans is host of "your bottom line," richard quest of "quest means business," david walker spent a decade oversaeg the federal government, how it spends your tax dollars as the u.s. comptroller general. today he's the ceo of come back america. he's an unapologetic deficit hawk. mohammed al arian is the ceo of pim he could. his firm is the largest investors in bonds. and stephen moore is the founder of the low tax advocacy group club for growth. i'm going to start
don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> ouch. athena jones live from washington. same old same old. where do we go from here? >> that's the big question. the nice talk after the election is pretty much gone away. you mentioned one of the big sticking points, that's taxes. republicans and democrats can't agree on how to raise the tax revenue? end the bush tax cuts for the wealthy, close the loopholes, raise the capital gains taxes or all of the above. right now, they can't agree on how much money should be raised on the revenue side. let's listen to more from harry reid about the democrats stance on this. >> we are ready to protect middle class families by freezing the tax rates for the first $250,000 and letting the rates go to the same level they were during the clinton administration. the republicans know where we stand. we have said it so many times, the president said the same thing. >> you know, reid is right. republicans know where the democrats stand. republicans feel that there's been way too much focus on this whole tax issue and not nearly enough of an
for washington to get in gear. do something about it. this fiscal cliff business could affect just about every single one of us, and you can bet there's plenty going on behind the scenes. this past hour we heard from the president in the east room of the white house basically announcing he's inviting leaders from both houses of congress and from both political parties to meet with him at the white house next friday. just a couple of minutes ago, we heard the president say he's open to compromise and open to new ideas, but there's one point the president is sticking to -- higher taxes for people making higher incomes. take a listen. >> i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000 aren't a asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> two hours before we saw the president, we saw the house speaker, republican, john boehner, said quote, everything on the revenue side and on the sp spending side has to be looked at but when it comes to specifics he put the b
encouraged petraeus to step down after learning of the affair. joining me now is rejeve from "the washington post." good morning to you. do you think general would have step dound if clapper hadn't suggested it? >> good morning, randi. i think pe tratraeus faced withs investigation, faced with officials understanding what has occurred between him and his biographer paula broadwell was left with little choice. with everything i know, i think that resignation would have been something he likely would have suggested himself as well. >> you have written quite a bit about petraeus. how surprised were you when you heard this news? >> profoundly surprised. it didn't seem in character. petraeus was something nr than just a shrewd battlefield tactician, a very capable strategist. for the last several years, he had fashioned himself as a leader of troops who spoke not just about courage on the battlefield but about personal character and virtue, and this was a man who held himself up and wanted the forces under him to hold themselves up to a higher standard. it really -- to all who know him -- and i'v
people here in washington are calling the fiscal cliff. today, we have new proof that people across the country not only are aware of what's going on, they're very, very worried. our new poll shows 68% say the country will face either a crisis or major problems if the cuts in taxes aren't avoided. and a whopping 77% say their personal financial situation will be affected by a failure to solve the fiscal cliff problem. despite this nationwide sense of urgency, there's only a little talk of compromise right now as lawmakers return to washington. our congressional correspondent, kate bolduan, has been working her sources on capitol hill and what's going on. stakes are enormous right now. what's going on? >> they were away for a week. staff was supposed to be working. but lawmakers are arriving back in town with no real whisper of an imminent breakthrough at the moment to avoid this looming series of tax increases and spending cuts that could very well damage the economy. but the air of compromise among some notable republicans is definitely grabbing attention. the republicans' comments
and washington state said yes to legalizing recreational marijuana. but will legal challenges put the brakes on things? our legal guys will weigh in coming up. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> the voters of colorado and washington state have spoken. they made it clear. they want to make it legal to smoke pot recreationally. the colorado governor says not so fast. he said this his words, federal law still says marijuana is an illegal drug so droeon't break the cheetos too quickly. there could be several legal challenges ahead on. this we want to bring in the legal
hike. america's now at the mercy of washington, hoping that both sides can end the fighting and make a deal. anti-tax champion grover norquist last night told me he's keeping republicans to the no tax increase pledge they made decades ago. but should his party back away from that promise? joining me in his first interview since the election, reince priebus, chairman of the republican national committee. welcome back, mr. priebus. how are you? >> doing great, piers. how are you? >> you have been keeping your head below the paraput since the shellacking you guys took in the election. what is your reaction to the pretty poor defeat? >> well, i think that we got to look at everything that we're doing. i think that's what we have to do. i don't think you can draw any quick conclusions other than the fact that we lost and we know that. but i think in order to get back in the game, you've got to look at and do a full autopsy of what happened, what we did well, what we didn't do well, what we can do better in the next year with two governors' races coming up and two years later, then four ye
. >> on the other side of the i'll, the gop handles the changing reality in washington. meanwhile, breaking news tonight, the nor'easter bearing down on new york and new jersey tonight. new york city's death toll has risen tonight. we are live in one of the hardest hit areas. jo joining me now, top strategist, david axelrod. >> it was a great night to be in that room with that crowd and the sense of joy frankly and spoke to the young volunteers and staff. and it was a very movingen count counter. when was the moment that you thought we've got this it is all going to plan. >> when the vote started getting counted we knew quickly we have a fairly sophisticated model. we knew when we were hitting our targets and our folks were skilled and when we saw the votes coming in, in ohio and virginia, and then in florida, there was a sense that this could be an earlier evening than we thought. we looked at the demographics. pretty much across the board you had a good night on women, independence, younger people. african-americans, it was a pretty big sweeping area of people coming into vote again for you gu
between washington progress and real progress. americans say they want real progress and real give-and-take to get there. listen to this. 72% in our brand-new cnn/orc poll say they want president obama to compromise with republicans on taxes and spending. an identical 72% want republicans to do the same, compromise with the other side. as for what compromise should entail, 67% favor a mix of spending cuts and tax increases. that's what they say real progress would look like. keeping them honest, real progress is one thing. washington progress is another. so far at least we see much more of the second than the first, and we're getting late new word that any progress might be stalled. more on that shortly. first, a good example of washington progress. republican lawmakers standing up in a limited way to a beltway power broker named grovier norquist over the 1980s era pledge he pressures them to sign promising not to raise any taxes ever. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. i made tennesseans aware. i was just elected. the only thing i'm honoring is the oath i take when i serve when i
to washington, where a hard fought campaign pales in comparison to the challenges that lie ahead. the nation is drawing closer and closer to the fiscal cliff. hello and good to see you here on this day after election day. i'm brooke baldwin at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta. >> i'm celebrating the day after. john king in washington. hey, brooke. >> good to see you. >> it is good to see you. talk on capitol hill is turning to compromise immediately after the election. listen here, the senate majority leader democrat harry reid. >> it is better to dance than to fight. it is better to work together. everything doesn't -- >> see what the house speaker john boehner has to say. he speaks live next hour. meantime, the biggest battleground still hangs in the balance, the election is not yet over in florida. the nation's largest swing state too close to call. oh, yes, brooke, they're still counting the absentee ballots. >> we'll go there. also happening right now, the market. we have to look at this, plunging down 264 points right now. investors turning their attention from the election to the
is live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, mark. so the house is back in session today, and so far there are no talks scheduled between top republicans and the president, we understand. >> no, that's true, zoraida. in fact we haven't seen the congressional leadership and president obama meet since november 16th. now there were staff discussions over the thanksgiving holiday. they don't seem to be as productive as some people had hoped, as you said, we are now 35 days until the fiscal cliff. what we do know, though, is that president obama did reach out to house speaker john boehner. he is the republican, the senate majority leader harry reid the democrat over the weekend, perhaps to try to jump-start the talks. as of now, as the house of representatives comes back today, as the senate came back yesterday, we're still very much in limbo on the fiscal cliff. >> here's something else we know. some major republicans have come out and they say that they don't feel bound by the americans for tax reform pledge. most recently we saw house majority leader eric cantor. do you bel
from washington. brianna, where does the obama administration stand right now with all of this? >> reporter: well, right now we are hearing from the white house who says this won't affect the president's attention to the fiscal cliff situation. that said, we do know that he has had to spend time on this. a limited amount of time in the words of white house press secretary jay carney, but we also know that a lot of staff hours have had to go to dealing with this situation with generals petraeus and allen. yesterday this was the first press conference that we had a chance to ask jay carney about this situation. and he said that the president thinks very highly of general allen, of his service to his country, of the job he's done in afghanistan. and one reporter asked if he, if the president has the full faith, or if general allen, i should say, has the full faith of president obama. and here's what carney said. >> he has faith in general allen, believes he's doing and has done an excellent job at isap. and i would rephrase the pentagon for the process underway with regards to gen
in america, and then you have this washington battle that appears intrangient as it has ever been. meanwhile, the debt rises to $16 trillion. >> i hoped that the president would say this, he has not, as yet. and i'm not holding my breath any longer, giving the clip you just showed. but the short answer, fiscal cliff is really just a masquerading of austerity, it is austerity in disguise. and the president and those of us who care about the future of this country in terms of this gap between have gots, and have notes, this is just austerity, they want to now basically scare those americans who are already on the short end of the stick with this conversation about a fiscal cliff. when the reality is that millions of americans have already gone over the fiscal cliff. and so this is a conversation that in some regards is a waste of time in washington, we ought to be talking about creating jobs and not about deficit reduction. it troubles me when the president himself even seems to go for that line about deficit reducti reduction. it ought to be about job kraeks. >> is he being bold enough? becau
to defuse the situation. that is not all washington is doing. let's go to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr in washington. barbara? >> the big concern here in washington is a ground war in gaza. there is growing concern that israeli troops and tank forces might cross the border and move into gaza. that is the major escalation that the u.s. does not want to see. so, the calculation now is, what does it take to make hamas stop its rocket attacks into israel and israel feel comfortable enough with that to pull back on the air strikes and pull back on any ground forces that it is assembling near the gaza border. there has been a lot of diplomacy going on. defense secretary leon panetta traveling in asia, calling the israeli defense minister barack. secretary of state hillary clinton firing up the diplomatic phone lines calling israel, turkey and jordan. randi? >> barbara starr in washington, thank you. as you can see, cnn has every angle covered on this story. >>> much more ahead this hour. here's a look at what we have coming up. >>> on the brink of war. as fighting escalates between isr
of the dangers of going over the so-called fiscal cliff. the one washington created. it seems with the noise of the campaign behind us, washington is listening which means that after several months of harping on the dangers that you face, i'm ready to make a big switch to telling you about the opportunities that lie ahead. i'm ali velshi and this is "your money." i will not drop this issue until it is settled. then we have the debt ceiling debate. but there is life after washington induced catastrophe. frankly, it looks like a pretty good life. if all goes according to plan, 2013 could be a big turn around year for the u.s. the start of a recovery that feels real. most of it will have very little to do with washington policy though your state and federal government will have to step in to make it happen. let me explain. first, there's an energy boom under way in the united states right now. fueled by hydraulic fracturing and by more drilling for oil. natural gas is currently cheap, abundant and increasingly used not just as a fuel source direct to home and businesses, but as a source for ele
headquarters in atlanta. >> i'm wolf blitzer in washington. this is cnn's special program, special coverage of america's choice 2012. we're bringing you the story behind the numbers. the demographic breakdown of the president's decisive victory and the implications for the republican party moving forward. >> we're also examining the challenges ahead for the president leading a divided nation and dealing with an immediate fiscal problem facing the country. and his victory speech, the president urged all americans to come together. he said what unites susbigger than what divides us. >> i believe we can seize this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we're not as cynical as the pundits believe. we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions, and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. and together, with your help and god's grace, we will continue our journey forward and remind the world just why it is that we live in the greatest nation on earth. thank you, america. god b
-mails they came upon david petraeus. let's stop it here and bring in suzanne -- suzanne kelly in washington, our intelligence correspondent. suzanne, a lot of ground to cover here. we have this video that has surfaced of paula broadwell, last month, speaking at the university of denver and she's speaking here as david petraeus' biographer about the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. let's take a listen. >> i don't know if a lot of you heard this, but the cia an annex had taken a couple prisoner and they think the attack on the consulate was an attempt to get the prisoners back. that's still being vetted. >> where did she hear that? did it come from david petraeus and do we know if her claim was true, the cia was holding captives inside a consular annex in benghazi? >> right, ted. this raises serious issues. she clearly said in the video the information she was sharing on libya and the cia holding prisoners there hadn't been vetted. so that means she is sharing something with -- that she heard with a public audience. that's concerning because they have to ask, what is your so
30 governors for the team. which is the highest level in 12 years. maybe another in washington state, so there was some bright spots, but overall, i agree. a combination of tone and message and reaching out to new and minority voters and making sure that we do a better job on the ground. >> well, gracious to come out and directly admit it, although you are right on on the governor's side. one of the wings that cornyn was referring to was the tea party and some big name tea partiers lost last night. joe walsh, josh mande ll, richard murdoch in indiana. he had a specific situation there with the comments he made on abortion, but i think the question is is the tea party still relevant? is it now become an albatross? >> erin, what the tea party and other conservatives that believe we ought to -- balance budget, i think that's pretty a mainstream idea. they helped me immensely with the victory in virginia three years ago. i think it's how we organize. how we deliver the message. we've got to be a lot more inclusive and open and energetic by expressing why these are -- we've just got to do
and you'll hear more of the evidence against armstrong. >>> imagine this, if you can can. a washington without gridlock. i'm not talking about the nation's capital but a town in virginia hoping the name sick gets its act together. >> just an hour outside of d.c., people in the small town of washington, virginia, spent months waiting to see what the election would bring their way. and many like cabinet maker peter cramer say they didn't much care about whether the democrats or republicans would win. just as long as the creeping economy starts racing again. >> i'm saying it's both of those people's faults. let's get some people in washington who want to solve the problem and stop the gridlock. >> next door at the gourmet farmers cafe, susan james spent the run up to the election feeling much the same way. >> the economy has changed the way we have conducted business and it's changed decisions we have made. major decision. >> instead of expanding her family-owned business, she kept a close eye on cost, steered clear of debt and watched the electoral process play out. >> what is it that yo
you think the tone in washington has been over the last four years, no matter how childishly you think a lot of lawmakers have acted on a structural level, who controls what, there may be less change than meets the eye which is why what you'll be hearing in washington in the coming weeks may sound less like this -- >> everything doesn't have to be a fight. everything doesn't have to be a fight. >> -- and more like this. more like each side getting ready for an epic fight. >> i do not think we should be raising taxes, especially when the country is on the brink of a recession. >> can you have a compromise? >> yes. >> that was a gasp before you said yes. that scares me. >> i will spend every moment in the senate working to help lead the effort to stop that. >> another round of tax breaks for very wealthy people will somehow trickle down. we know that doesn't work. >> the president wants to raise taxes. raise taxes on the wealthiest 2% of americans. my principle would be mr. president, we're not going to help you to get that done. >> olympia snowe is the outgoing republican senator from m
returned to washington yesterday. we were told though by the white house this evening he'll make a statement on the fiscal cliff tomorrow but as far as what we know right now the administration says the president has already laid out his plan. it's a plan he says would cut the deficit by $4 trillion over the next ten years. it's also a plan those, that we've told you before doesn't add up. so something has to give. and someone needs to take the helm. last night here on "outfront" we tried to find out from chris van hollen what the president's role would be on the fiscal cliff. >> that remains to be seen exactly who will be the negotiate or negotiators. the white house has to be engaged. the president will make clear as he did in his acceptance speech last night we need to compromise. i think the president will be directly involved. >> directly involved but not clear what his role would be. will the president take the lead? here's the thing. americans want answers soon. today i overheard a major democratic fundraiser and lobbyist ben barnes saying this to a high ranking member of
jones has more now from washington. >> it's time to get back to work. >> reporter: with the election in the rearview mirror, the focus in washington is back on efforts to avoid the economically devastating fiscal cliff. >> if we just go over the cliff and let those policies stay in effect, we're basically going to undo the recovery. metro party really wants to be blamed for that. >> reporter: the cliff amounts to $7 trillion in spending cuts and tax increases over the next decade. the threat of these painful cuts set to begin on january 1st is part of a deal congress and the president made last year to force them to agree on a long-term deficit reduction plan. >> this is a scenario that congress has said if we don't act, we're going to shoot ours. >> reporter: so far that long-term plan hasn't materialized. the biggest chunk of the cliff, the bush tax cuts. they're also a big sticking point. democrats say cuts for families making $250,000 or more must end. >> we're serious about reducing the deficit. we have to combine spending cuts with revenue, and that means asking the wealthiest
damage that america could do itself if washington allows us to go over the fiscal cliff. according to studies, the average household could pay $3500 more in taxes. unemployment in the u.s. which has come down to 7.9% could head back up above 9% by this time next year. the u.s. could join europe which has been hit by a double dip recession. and according to a pugh research/"washington post" poll, you clearly understand the danger of this fiscal cliff. 68% say it will have a major effect on the economy. 21% say just a minor infect. only 2% say no effect. 10% say they don't know which is why you're watching this right now. president obama's solution to all this is to make a deal centered around increasing taxes on the wealthy which will go a good part of the way to raising the $1.6 trillion in new revenue that he wants to raise over the next decade in his attempt to reduce the federal deficit. he wants to let the bush era tax cuts expire. if that happens, the top tax rate on income would jump from 36% to 39%. he likes to say that's where it was during the clinton years. the second top
with me here on this day after election day. special coverage continues with wolf blitzer in washington. hey, wolf. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, the president of the united states is on his way back to washington right now for four more years in the white house. you're going to see his return to the white house during this program. also, republicans still control the house of representatives. will the president find anymore cooperation in his second term than during his first? and after passage of an historic ballot question, how soon will it be until people in colorado can light up a marijuana cigarette legally? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> right now president obama's aboard air force one. he's heading east from chicago. he's already reaching out to congressional leaders trying to set the agenda for his second term in office. across the country today americans awoke to banner headlines from re-elected in the president's hometown "chicago tribune" to "obama wins in his adopted city" "the washington post." the "new york times" proclaimed it's obam
forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >>> good morning, washington dc. so glad you're starting your day with cnn. take a look there at the white house. you know folks are up and adam early trying to work out a deal on that fiscal cliff looming over all of us. you can say that 50 never looked so good, "sky fall" hoped last night, 50 years after the original. this is daniel craig's third turn as a super spy and the movie is making a killing. "variety" reports that the movie could take in $80 million in it's u.s. opening. most in franchise history. >> just because the election is over doesn't mean the politicians aren't still targets. the late night comedians had their way with washington last night, take a look. >>> i heard a update, power outages, anybody here? i heard a update from com-ed, the electricity company, they said the republicans flow be without power for the next four years. >> speaking of mitt romney, now that he's out of the presidential race, he will no longer receive protection from the secret service. or as big bird put it -- sup? >> 75% of the gas s
're in "the situation room." >>> intriguing new twists and turns in the scandal that's gripping washington, indeed the nation and much of the world. the affair that led general dividend petraeus to resign as director of the central intelligence agency. we're finding out that at least one lawmaker here in washington may have learned of it ahead of the president and there are questions about the investigation that led to petraeus' stunning downfall. brian todd's been working the story for us and getting new information. brian, tell our viewers what's the latest? >> we found out that the house majority leader, republican congressman eric cantor, may have found out almost two weeks before the president did. this and other time lines we're following on the investigation have led to genuine anger over why the ite house and other top congressional leaders weren't told sooner. a time line cnn has put together shows the republican house majority leader may have known about former cia director david petraeus' extramarital affair before the president did. that's according to aides to congressman eric
coach tom izzo live this hour. "newsroom" starts now. >>> and good morning from washingt washington. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining us. this morning, a shocking new development in the sex scandal that toppled one of the most respect respected men in washington. now it has snared another top general, john allen, commander of all international troops in afghanistan. today the feds are sifting through a mountain of e-mails and messages he traded with a woman named jill kelley. a mind boggling 20,000 to 30,000 pages and agents are searching for anything inappropriate. now here is the common link. that woman, kelley, jill kelley, she's the one who received harassing e-mails supposedly from petraeus' jealous mistress, paula broadwell. petraeus admits to the affair with broadwell and has said that this woman, kelley, is a family friend. we'll take a look at each of these players in a scandal that seems to grow more bizarre by the day. first stop, pentagon and cnn's chris lawrence. so, chris, what specifically are investigators looking for in those messages? morality aside,
be charges brought against her, but we're told she hired an attorney in washington, and i reached out several times to him today. haven't heard back yet. >> what do we know about the fbi agent that sent kelly shirtless pictures of himself? >> a u.s. official confirms the agent in question did send shirtless photos of himself to kelly, which opens up a host of questions. they also said that happened before this case ever began. we already know this was the agent kelly took her original concerns to when she received the e-mails she felt were threatening. an official we spoke with said this agent never worked the case, but passed on the information to special agents in another department, the cyber unit. it was that department that took up the investigation that eventually led to the affair between broadwell and general petraeus. >> this agent also who has not been identified, suzanne, who allegedly went to this republican member of congress from washington state, dave reichert, he then went to house minority leader, majority leader eric cantor who went to justice department and fbi and as a res
and spending cuts. jill doherty is in our washington bureau. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> jill, both sides have said they are optimistic about a deal here. they're also not budging on some key issues. >> yeah, i mean, there is some room around the edges, but essentially, and this is the the opening gambit, of course. they're both talking about taxes. the president saying -- and revenue. the president saying that he wants more revenue from the wealthiest americans and the republicans and especially mitch mcconnell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hi
reports. chris lawrence of the pentagon and brianna keeler in our washington bureau. let's start with chris. chris, we're talking about two high-level government officials in a scandal, general allen sent to become the supreme ally commander for nato. first off, what's the latest on the investigation? you are hearing anything? what is going to happen to general allen? >> reporter: yeah, right now what i'm hearing is that general allen is here in washington wondering exactly the same thing. he was just 48 hours away from going before that senate confirmation hearing to take over nato. now that has been postponed. he is here and people are wondering what's going to happen to him next. from what we've been able to determine from sources at the pentagon, basically they are looking at between 20 and 30,000 pages, most of them e-mails sent between general allen and jill kelly down in florida between 2010 and 2012. so right up until this year. i'm told the e-mails were inappropriate in nature and now the inspector general here at the pentagon is looking through those to see what exactly
. >>> welcome back, everybody. you're watching our special coverage of the election live from washington, d.c. this morning. with less than 24 hours to go, the candidates are focusing on the biggest prizes. those elusive swing states. right now, cnn has pennsylvania lean obama but both campaigns are fighting for the key stone state. today president obama is deploying bill clinton there, for four campaign stops. just one day after mitt romney took the state in pennsylvania, the theme from "rocky." pat toomey is a republican senator from pennsylvania. he campaigned with both romney and paul ryan this weekend. he joins us this morning. nice to see you, sir. thanks for talking with us. >> good morning, thanks for having me. >> appreciate that. we've heard sort of mixed messages on the state of pennsylvania. so lay it out for me. listen to republicans, they say pennsylvania is definitely in play. if you talk to the democrats, david plouffe said it's a sign of desperation to talk about pennsylvania. let me play for you what he said and then we'll answer that on the other side. >> we have a great
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 409 (some duplicates have been removed)